Wednesday, November 25, 2015

Sandy comes for a visit!

Sandy on the rocks

 Friday, my friend Sandy came for a visit. She lives in North Chatham, New York, which is a small town in upstate New York.  We spent the weekend doing things that both of us love to do. First thing we did was take a walk to the beach near my house. It was a beautiful day, so we took our lunch along and sat on the rocks looking out at the water and the lighthouse. So nice....

The lighthouse

 Saturday we went to my friend, Claudia Hopf's house, in Kennebunk Maine, for the annual Christmas open house. Claudia does beautiful Scherenschnitte , (paper cutting) and her son Perry , makes beautiful paint grained boxes and frames, ( Perry also makes incredible period frames). Kennebunk is a wonderful New England town, full of history and charm. There are wonderful houses from the 18th and 19th century. It is one of my favorite places.We spent a couple hours walking around looking at all the goods for sale. We both came out of the house carrying bags!

Claudia Hopf's house, circa 1830, Kennebunk, Maine

Our next stop was also in Kennebunk.  It is called Snug Harbor Farm, where they sell beautiful topiaries. Running around free were chickens of all kinds, happily pecking the ground. Snug Harbor also had some rare birds and a gorgeous peacock , that I tried to take a picture of but couldn't get a good shot of him.  The best part of course was looking into the greenhouses full of topiaries.  All shapes and sizes, and different types of plants.  Sandy came out of the greenhouse with a new canary! They also sell birds and had several canaries for sale. "Mr. Jefferson" was our campanion for the rest of the day. He was very well behaved.
Snug Harbor Farm, Kennebunk, Maine

The gift shop

Hen house? I love this building!

Greenhouse with topiaries....heavenly!

 After a nice lunch in Kittery, we went on through Portsmouth, New Hampshire , another of my very favorite places, to Newcastle, New Hampshire. Newcastle is just over a little causeway from Portsmouth and in the 18th and 19th centuries was a little fishing hamlet. Very charming, with little capes and windy streets. My friend Sharon has restored one of those little capes and is about to start on the interior restoration. We went to visit her. Sharon's house was originally built in the 18th century as a fish shack. Or so it seems. More research needs to be done but the history of the area suggests that her house was one of many dotting this coast and used as a cottage for fishing gear and also storage. Later it was sold and became a small house. Inside there are two fireplaces with ovens in the back. At one time this house, as small as it is , was owned by two different people. One on one side and another on the other side. Sharon and I plan on doing the deed work and researching more the history. Sharon spent a year carefully restoring the exterior. The exterior has hand skived clapboards and rosehead nails. She also had period windows with old glass made. The front door is an antique early door. I am excited to see what the inside will look like when she starts work on that.

Sharon's wonderful 18th century cape

The front of Sharon's house. Beautiful early doors!
Finally after a long day, we drove home with Mr. Jefferson, sitting on Sandy's lap. He is home with Sandy now in her house and getting used to his new home. Sandy wrote to tell me he is singing away and seems quite happy. Next post , I will tell more of the story......


  1. Looks like you and your friend Sandy had a great time visiting & seeing the sites. Your area of the country is so lovely and rich with history. I have been to New England a couple of times and fell in love with the simple Cape Cod house, so charming.

  2. Thank you Peggy for taking me along on this visit with all of you in such a wonderful post! I love Sharon's little house! I am so glad I got to meet her when I was with you. Please do keep us up on her progress with this precious little building. I do know Sandy also through the internet. Merry Christmas to each of you. warmly, E